How can I help families I Home Teach understand the importance of the visits?

How can I help families I Home Teach understand the importance of the visits?

Question

 

Gramps,

I’ve got two families that don’t seem to want home teachers to come. They tell me we can set something up when I see them in person.Yet never respond to texts or phone calls, And when I just stop by they are always busy and never invite us in. I am frustrated because I want them to enjoy the blessings of home teaching and I feel by their behavior I am losing out on blessings as well. What should I do?

Dev

 

Answer

 

Dear Dev,

I commend your for your effort to be a good home teacher and serve the Lord.

Pres. Monson had some counsel that could be helpful here:

Abraham Lincoln offered this wise counsel, which surely applies to home teachers: “If you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend.” President Ezra Taft Benson urged: “Above all, be a genuine friend to the individuals and families you teach.” 

 

As the Savior declared to us, “I will call you friends, for you are my friends.”  A friend makes more than a dutiful visit each month. A friend is more concerned about helping people than getting credit. A friend cares. A friend loves. A friend listens. And a friend reaches out.

Home Teaching-A Divine Service

 

The first step in being a friend to these families may be to appreciate that they do not have a testimony of home teaching.  They may not be interested in religion at all, or may be attending another church.  From their point of view, they have no need of your visits.  Being a friend means trying to understand where they are coming from.

Next, you need to try to build a relationship of trust.  Let them know that you want to get to know them and will accept them as they are.  I know you want to teach them a lesson and see them return to church, but suppose for a moment you are a football fan.  How likely would you be to invite someone into your home who just wants to talk to you about the opera?  On the other hand, if you have a FRIEND, who happens to like the opera, you would likely invite them over and even let them talk about the opera-a little.

How to you become a friend to someone who is avoiding you?  It’s not easy, and it will take time and patience.  The most important thing to do is pray and ask the Lord how to become their friend.  He knows them, and loves them.  He can guide you.  He might inspire you to take them cookies, veggies from your garden, or potted flowers for their garden. Perhaps you will feel prompted to send a friendly letter monthly, or offer to mow their lawn, shovel their driveway etc.

Human nature is such that if they perceive you to be someone who genuinely cares about them, rather than someone who is fulfilling a role, they will likely return the gesture of friendship.  There is a couple in my ward who treated their home teacher much as you describe.  He persisted though and eventually they started letting him in.  He became their friend.  The wife also had wonderful visiting teachers that did the same.  Eventually strong friendships were formed, and when the couple was ready, they began to attend church.  Recently they were sealed in the temple.

Not all of these stories have picture perfect endings like this.  Some people will never return or even let you in the door regardless of what you do–be their friend anyway.  The Lord will not judge you on whether or not your home teaching families come to church, what He is concerned with is how you serve Him by loving them.  Just love them to the best of your ability and the Lord will be pleased with your efforts.

 

Beat of luck,

 

Gramps

 

 

How can our weaknesses become strengths?

How can our weaknesses become strengths?

Question

 

Gramps,

How do weaknesses with pornography and other sexual issues become strong? How do weak things become strong in this case?

Anonymous

 

Answer

 

Dear Anonymous,
Before I answer your question about how we can be strengthened, I feel the need to clarify that sin and weakness are not the same thing.  They are, however, both parts of our fallen nature.
I feel the need to emphasize the difference because you appear to be referencing Ether 12:27:
“And if men come unto me I will show unto them their weakness. I give unto men weakness that they may be humble; and my grace is sufficient for all men that humble themselves before me; for if they humble themselves before me, and have faith in me, then will I make weak things become strong unto them”
It is important to note that the Lord gives us weaknesses, but He does not give us sin.  I understood your intent to mean the desire to give up sins like pornography and sexual sin, but the difficulty in doing so, similar to what an alcoholic may feel about getting sober: the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.  For that reason, I want to share a talk Elder Bednar gave to a BYU audience about the “stengthening and enabling power of the Atonement”.
He says we often talk about the cleansing power of the Atonement for sin, but we don’t appreciate the power of the Atonement to help us in other ways.  I think those other ways apply to the “weakness” you are speaking of.
Elder Bednar said:
“If I were to emphasize one overarching point this morning, it would be this: I suspect that you and I are much more familiar with the nature of the redeeming power of the Atonement than we are with the enabling power of the Atonement. It is one thing to know that Jesus Christ came to earth to die for us. That is fundamental and foundational to the doctrine of Christ. But we also need to appreciate that the Lord desires, through His Atonement and by the power of the Holy Ghost, to live in us—not only to direct us but also to empower us. I think most of us know that when we do things wrong, when we need help to overcome the effects of sin in our lives, the Savior has paid the price and made it possible for us to be made clean through His redeeming power. Most of us clearly understand that the Atonement is for sinners. I am not so sure, however, that we know and understand that the Atonement is also for saints—for good men and women who are obedient and worthy and conscientious and who are striving to become better and serve more faithfully. I frankly do not think many of us “get it” concerning this enabling and strengthening aspect of the Atonement, and I wonder if we mistakenly believe we must make the journey from good to better and become a saint all by ourselves through sheer grit, willpower, and discipline, and with our obviously limited capacities.”

In the Strength of the Lord

 

I believe an unfortunate aspect of sin is the belief that we must now overcome our sins before we can return to Christ.  But that is one of Satan’s most powerful lies.  Satan wants to isolate you, to make you think you have to do the work on your own.  But he knows that is impossible!

 

We cannot overcome our sins and/or weaknesses without the Savior’s help.  Christ wants us to come to Him with our sins and weaknesses, He wants to help us overcome them.  We say, “Oh no! I couldn’t go to Christ yet, I’m not worthy.”  Remember when Christ asked to wash Peter’s feet and Peter strongly objected.  He didn’t feel worthy to have Christ wash His feet, just as sometimes we do not feel worthy to come to the Lord with our sins.  But note what the Savior said to Peter, “If I wash thee  not, thou hast no part with me.”  John 13:8

 

What He said to Peter, He says to all of us.  Let his Atonement work in your life…not only to cleanse and forgive your sins, but to strengthen and enable you to overcome them.  And when you have overcome your sins, with His help, then continue to draw on the power of the Atonement to overcome the natural man.

 

Our strength comes from turning to Christ in our weakness and sin.

 

Gramps

 

 

P.S. You might also find this website helpful:   Overcoming Pornography

 

What is the benefit of keeping a journal if I don’t have family?

What is the benefit of keeping a journal if I don’t have family?

Question

 

Gramps,

What is the benefit of keeping a journal if I don’t have a family? I am the last one alive in my family, no children, nieces or nephews. I made an interstate move a while ago and packed up 40 years of journals with me. UPS made pretty good money as it took several boxes to ship these things to my new home (I don’t drive). For the last several years I’ve been scanning to the computer to save space and be ready for the next move. (I’ve lived in Utah for 9 years now and I don’t intend to die here.

Shasta

 

Answer

 

Shasta,

One of my favorite glimpses into the humanity of the Book of Mormon’s writers is Chemish, the son of Omni, brother of Amaron.

“Now I, Chemish, write what few things I write, in the same book with my brother; for behold, I saw the last which he wrote, that he wrote it with his own hand; and he wrote it in the day that he delivered them unto me. And after this manner we keep the records, for it is according to the commandments of our fathers. And I make an end.”  (Omni 1:9)

It sounds like Amaron did his duty to write on the plates of Nephi the way some of us do our home teaching: on the last possible day of the month.  He wrote the little bit that he did on the last day he had the plates, before giving them to his brother.  Then Chemish wrote a little and said, “And after this manner, we keep the records… .”  The whole Book of Omni covers several generatons and provides interesting insights into the passing of time and history.  Unfortunately, its sparse record leaves us hungry for more.  Does this describe our journals?

If you think about it, the Book of Mormon is a compilation from the writings that were recorded in “journals” by ancient saints.  Not all of them were called as prophets in an official capacity.  According to tradition, Luke was one of the Seventy, and as such, an occasional companion to Paul, but he wasn’t an apostle, prophet, or a president of the Church.  He took it upon himself to write the narrative that is now known as the Gospel of Luke.  We can’t say that this was an official assignment, but in the text, it is addressed to someone named Theophilus.  Luke wasn’t intentionally writing scripture–he was sharing his knowledge and testimony with a friend.  Without the Gospel of Luke, many important details of Jesus’ life and birth would have been lost to history.

Likewise, the epistles of the New Testament were letters of guidance, exhortation, and counsel to the dispersed congregations of saints.  Their writers didn’t sit down to write scripture.  They were regulating the affairs of the Church, urging faithfulness, instructing in doctrine, correcting misunderstandings, and warning against dangers.  They became scripture–but they weren’t written as scripture.

Latter-day Saints have a unique understanding of revelation and scripture.  In Doctrine and Covenants 68:4, the Lord instructed:

“And whatsoever they shall speak when moved upon by the Holy Ghost shall be scripture, shall be the will of the Lord, shall be the mind of the Lord, shall be the word of the Lord, shall be the voice of the Lord, and the power of God unto salvation.”

When you write in your journal, you may be moved upon to bear your testimony, to offer reflections on your trials, and to share hopes for the good to prevail.  You may share your struggles against adversity and even feelings of inadequacy.  It is entirely conceivable that something you write could end up providing comfort or guidance for someone–even hundreds of years from now.

President Kimball once exhorted members to keep a journal and told them that, in the future, angels may quote from it.  You might think this unlikely, but do you think that the writers of Ecclesiastes or Proverbs would imagine that we would be quoting from them and finding comfort in their words centuries later?

If we don’t write the details of events down in a journal, how easy it is to forget them.  The Savior commanded Nephi to write down the prophecy of Samuel the Lamanite.  If he had not done so, that marvelous prophecy would not have been preserved to us.  Joseph Smith advised keeping careful records of events, stating that some important details of the Restoration had already been lost because they weren’t written down, likely referring to the dates of the First Vision and the restoration of the Melchizedek Priesthood.  Adam’s “journal” was called a “book of remembrance”, because it preserved knowledge of important events for later dispensations.

I once provided this scenario to a youth Sunday School class:  Imagine people living in the end of the Millennium.  There will come a time when Satan is loosed once more, and he will begin to corrupt a world that has known nothing but peace for hundreds of years.  Contention, strife, dissension, apostasy, and wars will ensue, leading up to the final battle of Gog and Magog.  Before that time comes, there will be saints who will struggle with the same conditions that are eminently familiar to us today.  Where will they turn for counsel, instruction, and hope?  They will turn to the “scriptures” that were left behind by the saints who lived in the last time Satan had dominion over the telestial world.  They might find hope in the words of the “Epistle of Juan to his brother Marco” or in the “Gospel of Kimberly.”  Who knows, there might be a Gospel Doctrine class lesson manual, some 800 years into the Millennium that quotes from the “Testament of Shasta.”

When you are writing your journal, you are providing a record for the future which God can use to inspire and instruct others, as well as to be a reminder to yourself of how far you’ve come.  There is a power in the written word that is eternal.  What is recorded on earth is recorded in heaven (D&C 128:7).  For this reason, we should ensure that our journals are accurate, balanced, and without exaggeration.  We do not need to dwell on the sordid details of our mistakes; neither should we overemphasize our triumphs.  What will appear as we record our experiences is the evidence of the hand of Providence guiding our lives for his own purposes.  We will see the Lord’s influences in our lives in ways we may not have noticed at the time we underwent a particular experience, but which only became apparent years after the event.

Journals, personal and family histories, are treasures for future generations.  It was the case with the records that became the Book of Mormon, that Ammaron had no family to whom he could pass on the records.  He found a “sober child” ten year-old named Mormon, whom he perceived to be “quick to observe”, and he made arrangements to ensure that Mormon would receive the records and the requisite instructions to carry out the task of perserving them (Mormon 1:2).  If you have no family to whom you can leave your journals when you pass, it may be possible to bequeath them to another person you trust, to the Church archives, or to a historical society where they might be preserved.  Scanning your journals is an excellent idea to preserve them from decay and loss.

 

Gramps

 

 

Is it okay to say “Oh my gosh” or is that taking the Lord’s name in vain?

Is it okay to say “Oh my gosh” or is that taking the Lord’s name in vain?

Question

 

Gramps,

Is it okay to say “Oh my gosh” or is that taking the Lord’s name in vain?

Kelly

 

Answer

 

Kelly,

Kelly, I am going to give you an answer you are probably not expecting. Although words like fetch, heck, gosh, even darn and dang are crass and reflective of a weak vocabulary and social mimicry, they are not a direct violation of the third commandment. The third commandment states,
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.” (Exodus 20:7)
It is commonly understood that this commandment speaks to the specific use of the name of God in non-holy contexts and generally of language vulgarity in communication; it actually has little to do with that. To better understand the commandment, Allow me to insert some clarifying words, “Thou shalt not take upon you the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taken his name upon him in vain.”
President Gordon B. Hinckley once explained:
So serious was violation of this law considered in ancient Israel that blasphemy of the name of the Lord was regarded as a capital crime. There is an interesting account in the book of Leviticus:

The son of an Israelitish woman “blasphemed the name of the Lord, and cursed. And they brought him unto Moses. …

 

“And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying,

 

“Bring forth him that hath cursed … and let all that heard him lay their hands upon his head, and let all the congregation stone him.

 

“And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying, Whosoever curseth his God shall bear his sin.

 

“And he that blasphemeth the name of the Lord, he shall surely be put to death, and all the congregation shall certainly stone him” (Lev. 24:11–16).

 

While that most serious of penalties has long since ceased to be inflicted, the gravity of the sin has not changed.  Take Not the name of  God in Vain

In the sacrament prayer over the bread, we witness that we are “willing to take upon [us] them the name of thy Son.” Taking His name upon us is a commitment that we will (1) proclaim our devotion to him and (2) act in ways that will be consistent with His discipleship. The third commandment warns all those who act hypocritically or who do not act in ways consistent with discipleship that they will not be held guiltless. Coming back to your question, “Is it okay to say “Oh my gosh?'” The actual speaking of the word “gosh” or even “God” is not as much a third commandment issue as the question of whether or not someone who has covenanted to take upon themselves the name of Christ would talk like that.

 

Gramps

 

 

Must I keep a promise of torturing myself?

Must I keep a promise of torturing myself?

Question

 

Gramps,

A while back I made a promise to God that I would stop falling asleep when I wake up in the mornings so as to spend that time more productively by reading scriptures, etc. However, after breaking this promise for the fourth or fifth time, I became consumed by such inextinguishable  guilt and shame that I recklessly promised God that if I failed to keep my promise again that I would torture myself in some way or another every day of my life. I broke my promise again, so do I have to torture myself?

Austen

 

Answer

 

Dear Austen,

I commend you on your efforts to use your time wisely and spend more time with your scriptures.  Both of these desires are pleasing to the Lord, I’m sure.  I do not, however, think the Lord would want you to torture yourself, in any way.  There are two issues I would like you to consider.  First, what is a covenant with the Lord, and second, what is the Lord’s form of punishment.

It is true that we should strive to keep our covenants.  At LDS.org we can read a clear, simple definition of a covenant:

“A covenant is a sacred agreement between God and a person or group of people. God sets specific conditions, and He promises to bless us as we obey those conditions. When we choose not to keep covenants, we cannot receive the blessings, and in some instances we suffer a penalty as a consequence of our disobedience.” Covenant

Notice Austen that in the covenants we make in church, God sets the conditions.  God not you.  In your case, you made a promise, which is a little different since you initiated it, but even with promises God needs to agree.  The following verses in the Doctrine and Covenants suggest to me that Heavenly Father would not agree with your plan to hurt yourself as punishment.

 

Doctrine and Covenants 121:41-43

 41 No power or influence can or ought to be maintained by virtue of the priesthood, only by persuasion, by long-suffering, by gentleness and meekness, and by love unfeigned;

 

 42 By kindness, and pure knowledge, which shall greatly enlarge the soul without hypocrisy, and without guile—

 

 43 Reproving betimes with sharpness, when moved upon by the Holy Ghost; and then showing forth afterwards an increase of love toward him whom thou hast reproved, lest he esteem thee to be his enemy;

The Lord’s emphasis here is on gentleness, meekness and love.  Torture is not mentioned at all.

My suggestion to you, Austen, is to be more patient and kind to yourself.  Go back to your knees, talk to the Lord about how you now understand that torturing yourself is not His will.  Ask Him for guidance about how to improve your scripture study.  Consider, Austen, that maybe mornings are just not the best time for you to study your scriptures.  Counsel with the Lord about a time of day that could work better for you.

Be gentle and loving with yourself.

 

 

Gramps

 

 

 

What does Tongues of Angels mean?

What does Tongues of Angels mean?

Question

 

Gramps,

What does tongues of angels mean?

Betty

 

Answer

 

Betty,

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland gave a most moving talk in General Conference regarding this subject in 2007 (The Tongue of Angels).  In this talk he states:

“So, brothers and sisters, in this long eternal quest to be more like our Savior, may we try to be “perfect” men and women in at least this one way now—by offending not in word, or more positively put, by speaking with a new tongue, the tongue of angels. Our words, like our deeds, should be filled with faith and hope and charity, the three great Christian imperatives so desperately needed in the world today. With such words, spoken under the influence of the Spirit, tears can be dried, hearts can be healed, lives can be elevated, hope can return, confidence can prevail. I pray that my words, even on this challenging subject, will be encouraging to you, not discouraging, that you can hear in my voice that I love you, because I do. More importantly, please know that your Father in Heaven loves you and so does His Only Begotten Son. When They speak to you—and They will—it will not be in the wind, nor in the earthquake, nor in the fire, but it will be with a voice still and small, a voice tender and kind.  It will be with the tongue of angels.”

 

 

You might also want to refer to a previous question and answer that was given on this website:  What does it mean to speak with the tongues of angels?

Hopefully with what has been previously answered, and with Elder Holland’s talk, your question will be answered.

 

Gramps

How can I unite a job with my faith?

How can I unite a job with my faith?

Question

 

Dear Gramps,

I am a graphic designer and got offered a job where I would be working on mainly tobacco material. This would be my first job and I should be happy I found something  but I don’t know how to unite  this with my faith. What are your thoughts?

Thank you in advance.

Julia

 

Answer

 

Dear Julia,

Congratulations on your first job.  You must be very excited.  Yet, as you said there are some complications with this particular job.  Let’s consider this for a moment. First it is your first job.  It will give you experience and could help you move on to another job in the future.  On the other hand, I’m guessing that graphic design has something to do with marketing?  So in other words you would be helping to sell cigarettes, is that correct?

If you were my granddaughter, I would counsel you not to use your God-given talent to promote a product that God and modern medicine have both decreed as dangerous.  Trust the Lord, Julia.  Throughout my life whenever I have sacrificed in order to do what I felt the Lord wanted, He has always blessed me.  If you turn down this job, and wait for something else, He will bless you too.

Elder Faust said something that applies here:

 

The Lord can do remarkable miracles with a person of ordinary ability who is humble, faithful, and diligent in serving the Lord and seeks to improve himself. This is because God is the ultimate source of power. By the gift of the Holy Ghost we can not only know all things but even “the truth of all things.” 

Many of you worry about your future. I think every conscientious young man [or young woman] does. But you do not realize what opportunities lie ahead of you.

Acting for Ourselves and Not Being Acted Upon

Hold out for the blessings that the Lord desires to bestow upon you.  You won’t regret it.

 

Gramps

 

 

 

How can I cultivate friendships in my ward through service?

How can I cultivate friendships in my ward through service?

Question

 

Hi Gramps,

I find myself repeatedly trying to form Mormon friendships based off of serving others – multiple rides per week, doing dishes, etc. Each time – my efforts fail when I fail to live up to the expectations of the other person. For example, car breaks down after 50+ rides, etc.

How come the bishop and his wife seem to be able to cultivate amazing connections with ward members through “service” while I seem to fail every time?

Chelsea

 

Answer

 

Dear Chelsea,

It sounds like you are lonely, and I am sorry about that.  Being lonely is a very painful thing.  I think though, that you are operating under some misconceptions that are hampering you from your goal of making friends. You are right that sometimes service (particularly Visiting and Home teaching) can help friendships develop.  We are taught at church that “you love who you serve”.  Unfortunately, as you have experienced, that love is not always returned.  Remember when the Christ cleansed ten lepers, but only one took the time to thank him?  People are like that sometimes.

 

Chelsea, you have no truer friend than the Savior.  He literally gave His life for you.  When you perform service, or do anything else in the church, like fulfill a calling, or pay tithing, you should do it with Christ in mind.  Do it because of your love for Him and your gratitude for His incomparable gift.  If you do that, you will be happier and you will grow closer to Him.

 

You mention the bishop and his wife making friends, but consider the last time your ward got a new bishop.  From the moment the new Bishop is called he is held in higher esteem.  Before he has lifted one finger in service, more people want to be his friend and have his approval.  This is not because he has served.  It’s because of the respect members have for the mantel of his calling.  In time, his service, and the sacrifice of his wife and family, endear them even more to the ward, but service is really only a part of it.  Keep in mind also, that the service he gives is helping people repent, giving inspired guidance to someone in a difficult time and things of this nature.  Of course, people helped in this manner feel a gratitude toward him which is more than they might feel toward someone who gave them a ride.

 

So serve because you want to please the Lord.  In order to make friends, I have found that a lot of people are lonely, but don’t know how to reach out to others.  You have clearly been trying to reach out, and that is a good beginning.  May I suggest you change your effort a bit?  If you feel comfortable, invite a few friends to your home for dinner and a movie, or invite anyone who is interested to go to a restaurant and a movie.  You could also look for a few walking partners, walking together gives a lot of opportunity for talking and building friendship.  I promise you there are many other lonely people in your ward.  You just need to find them.

 

Good luck, Chelsea.

 

Gramps

 

 

How can I get past doubting everything?

How can I get past doubting everything?

Question

 

Dear Grandpa,

I converted to the church about a year ago after investigating for six months. Soon after my baptism I stopped attending church. I am really unsure as to why I stopped, but I did. I loved going to church, I loved reading from the Book of Mormon, gaining a testimony and developing a relationship with Heavenly Father. But, now I seem to doubt everything and I’ve been told it’s because I’ve given room for Satan to deceive me, but I even doubt that now. Please help me.

Ella

 

Answer

 

Dear Ella,

You are not alone in your feelings. Others have felt this way as well, In fact, Pres. Uchtdorf spoke about this:

“By the same token, if we remove ourselves from the light of the gospel, our own light begins to dim—not in a day or a week but gradually over time—until we look back and can’t quite understand why we had ever believed the gospel was true. Our previous knowledge might even seem foolish to us because what once was so clear has again become blurred, hazy, and distant.” Receiving a Testimony of Light and Truth

 

Ella, you clearly have a desire to believe. That is an excellent place to start. The prophet Alma (n the Book of Mormon) taught:

But behold, if ye will awake and arouse your faculties, even to an experiment upon my words, and exercise a particle of faith, yea, even if ye can no more than desire to believe, let this desire work in you, even until ye believe in a manner that ye can give place for a portion of my words. Alma 32:27

In other words you need to repeat the same steps that you took when you first joined the church.
1- have a desire to know, and an open mind
2- pray
3- read the scriptures, go to church, read church magazines…things to help you learn
4- pray

In that chapter, Alma compares the word to a seed we plant in our hearts. Plant the seed, Ella. Do your part and the Lord will do the rest. He is anxiously waiting to welcome you back.

 

 

Gramps

 

Am I living in the past if I don’t care for the tv shows of today?

Am I living in the past if I don’t care for the tv shows of today?

Question

 

Dear Gramps,

The values and beliefs expressed in modern day movies and TV shows are really offensive to me, and leave me feeling poorly afterwards.  So I have pretty much abandoned them and gone to watching the old black and white movies and TV shows from the 1930s-1960s, where values and morals are more in line with the Church.  My wife says I am in denial and living in the past.  She watches her shows in the living room, and I watch mine in the bedroom.  What do you think?

Robert

 

Answer

 

Dear Robert,

I think you are both right.  I would agree with your wife that not everything on TV these days is inappropriate. Elder M. Russell Ballard agrees.  In his conference talk, Let Our Voices Be Heard, he said:

“Because of its sheer size, media today presents vast and sharply contrasting options. Opposite from its harmful and permissive side, media offers much that is positive and productive. Television offers history channels, discovery channels, education channels. One can still find movies and TV comedies and dramas that entertain and uplift and accurately depict the consequences of right and wrong.”

Elder Ballard also addressed your concerns:

“The choices we make in media can be symbolic of the choices we make in life. Choosing the trendy, the titillating, the tawdry in the TV programs or movies we watch can cause us to end up, if we’re not careful, choosing the same things in the lives we live.

If we do not make good choices, the media can devastate our families and pull our children away from the narrow gospel path.”

Let Our Voices be Heard

Elder Joe J. Christensen also talked about media during General Conference.  In his talk “The Savior is Counting on You” he said:

“Next, the Savior is counting on you to avoid the immoral trash that surrounds you in the media. Satan has made great inroads into the lives of some Latter-day Saints through the evil in the media.”

The Savior is Counting on You

Perhaps it would be helpful for you and your wife to sit down, read these two talks and have a discussion–with respect for one another’s feelings.

You might also want to reconsider that TV in the bedroom.  Elder Nelson gave a list of things we can do and one of them was:

“We need to have TVs and computers in a much-used common room in the home, not in a bedroom or a private place.”

 

 

Gramps

 

 

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