Why do we get married for “time and all eternity” if we don’t comprehend eternity?

Why do we get married for “time and all eternity” if we don’t comprehend eternity?

Question

 

Hello Gramps!

I have been a bit frustrated over this past month. My grandfather proposed to a woman who he has known for quite some time, but only recently did he start dating her. It troubles me, especially because my grandmother died a little over a year ago. My question is: Why are we obligated to marry in the Temple for “time and all eternity” if we do not comprehend eternity? It’s like a contract (covenant) where you are ignorant of all the implications beyond a certain point (death).

Joshua

 

Answer

 

Hi Joshua,

Condolences on the death of your grandmother.

Your stated question is straightforward to answer. You seem to have another question that is much trickier, though. Let me start with the stated question.

We are obligated to marry in the temple without fully understanding what that encompasses for the same reason we are obligated to make any other covenant, such as baptism, before we fully understand it. We cannot fully understand any covenant without making and living that covenant. When I was a young pup, my mother told me that when we go on a mission, get married, or at any other major step, we don’t fit the shoes we’re given. Instead, we have to grow into them. Our Heavenly Father understands that we can’t receive all things at once.

Can you imagine if you explained to a young child all the obligations of Church membership? The poor child would not understand, and would be overwhelmed and frightened at what you were saying. We grow in our understanding line upon line and precept upon precept. Even adults who come into the Church by baptism don’t fully comprehend what is in store; they know only that they feel the Spirit and want to follow Christ. I think it’s safe to say that faithful, lifelong members of the Church are still discovering what discipleship entails.

The very same principle applies to marriage. I was married for a quarter of a century before I began discovering some aspects of what I needed to do as a husband. It didn’t matter that I already had some adult children. My education was only beginning. And you know what? It’s the same way now. The older I get, the more I discover things I never dreamed of earlier.

Now, you seem to have an unspoken question, as well, something like, “How can my Grandfather spend his life with my Grandmother and then go and marry someone else barely a year after she died?” That’s a much more sensitive question, and I can’t answer it. Even if I knew your grandfather, I probably would not be able to answer it. People’s thoughts and perceptions take place between their ears, in a place no one can reach besides themselves and God.

Think of it this way: Your Grandmother’s death was doubtless difficult for you, but it was probably much harder for your Grandfather, who lost his lifelong companion and, perhaps, his closest friend and confidante. He needs to figure out how to move past that. It’s his burden to carry, and no one else’s, though others can help. In an eternal sense, your Grandmother is neither gone nor forgotten. It’s no betrayal of her if your Grandfather remarries. If he has found someone he wants to marry and who wants to marry him, then that is how he continues progressing in this life. Give him a hug and sincerely wish him luck.

 

Gramps

 

 

Is it bad to read controversial LDS material?

Is it bad to read controversial LDS material?

Question

Dear Gramps.

I just recently re-joined Facebook and I have noticed a lot of topics that pop up on my time line that are somewhat negative about the gospel.  I am so tempted to read up on what is happening in the church and its disciplinary actions against some controversial members or former members.

I’m particularly interested on hearing about the reasons why devout members leave the church because I want to study it out in my mind and argue it away.  Is this detrimental or a good thing?

 

Laura

 

Answer

Laura,

Indeed there are a lot of things in the media these days about the Church–some good, some bad, and nearly every point in between. Before you click on those links, a useful question would be “Will this build my testimony, or challenge it?” I want it understood that a challenge to your testimony is not a bad thing. It’s one of the ways we grow in the gospel. However, we already know that Satan is attacking us on all sides. Do we really need to seek him and his followers out?

Researching such material can be helpful, educational, and even faith-building. From personal experience, I must caution you that sincere, and regular personal prayer tied directly to such research is the first and most important thing you must do to avoid the pitfalls and other traps of Satan.

There are better ways to build your testimony. The truth is what it is, and it is twisted, misrepresented, ignored, and abused in countless sickening ways in the hands of those who would see this Church crumble apart. Without enough care, you will not be able to tell the truth from the lies, and you will risk falling away from the Church yourself.

As for disciplinary councils, I’m afraid you’ll never be able to research them completely. The Church, as a rule, never discloses the proceedings. They are private, and deeply personal events in a member’s life, regardless of how they view it themselves. Because of this, you’ll only be able to read whatever it is the individual themselves have written, and there’s no guarantee that what they write is the complete truth of the matter. In fact, such is very rarely the case.

The most common reason for a disciplinary council is when a member has committed such serious sins that the normal path of repentance is not adequate. Higher profile situations are when a member has been attacking the Church, its doctrines, or its leaders in a public forum for some time. In either case, it is never the desire of the Church to cut one off from salvation for all eternity. Rather it is a last step effort in beginning the repentance process with that member, that they may retain the blessings of the gospel. Thus, the outcome of a disciplinary council varies according to the reaction of the member.

If they are humbled, and see where they’ve taken themselves, the repentance process begins immediately. Sometimes even then an excommunication takes place, but with an eye toward the member regaining their membership in the future according to their individual situation.

If they are not humbled, (and frankly, these are the ones you hear about more often) and the member rejects any notion that they are in the wrong, then excommunication takes place. By excommunication it is meant that the individual loses all blessings, promises, authority, and other benefits with being a member of the Church. If a male is excommunicated, he loses all authority in the priesthood and it is taken from him by the same God who gave it to him.

Again, this is not meant to be a permanent end, however many people who are excommunicated seem to treat it that way. When the time comes that someone wishes to return to the Church, they are welcomed with open arms, so long as they are willing to humble themselves before the Lord, as is required of us all.

I pray that the Lord will bless you with wisdom in your efforts. Never cease to reach out to Him for all your needs, and may God be with you always.

 

 

 

Gramps

What do Mormons believe about respecting animals?

What do Mormons believe about respecting animals?

Question

Gramps,

In my experience it seems that a lot of Mormons don’t respect animals. When I was at BYU my roommates didn’t respect them. Once a cat got into the apartment and before I could gently guide the cat outside a roommate of mine grabbed the cat by the scruff of her neck and threw her out. I’ve known a lot of LDS people who have stated they don’t really care for dogs and cats. Someone told me me that she grew up on a farm and animals were there to do some kind of work not to be a companion.

Gail

 

Answer

Gail,

It sounds like you care about a lot about animals. I understand. My dog is curled up by my feet as I write this.  Fortunately, there is much evidence in both the words and actions of our leaders, and in the scriptures to show us that kindness to animals (domestic or wild) is very important to our Father in Heaven.

For example, Pres. Howard W. Hunter is noted to have had a beloved cat that he rescued as a kitten.  When he was about seven years old he passed by an irrigation ditch near his home and saw several older boys throw a kitten into the water.  When the kitten crawled out, they threw it in again.  After the boys left, Pres. Hunter took the kitten home warmed it up by his family’s wood stove, fed it and nursed it back to health.  It became a loved family pet.   Sharing Time: Reverence for Heavenly Father’s Creatures.

Pres. Joseph F. Smith taught: “Kindness to the whole animal creation and especially to all domestic animals is not only a virtue that should be developed, but is the absolute duty of mankind.  . . . It is an unrighteous thing to treat any creature cruelly. . . . The Gospel and Animals

This kindness to animals extends beyond pets and other domestic animals. Pres. Kimball and other leaders talked about not killing animals for sport, and Joseph Smith taught that even snakes should be treated with kindness.

“In pitching my tent we found three massasaugas or prairie rattlesnakes, which the brethren were about to kill, but I said, ‘Let them alone—don’t hurt them! How will the serpent ever lose his venom, while the servants of God possess the same disposition and continue to make war upon it? Men must become harmless, before the brute creation; and when men lose their vicious dispositions and cease to destroy the animal race, the lion and the lamb can dwell together, and the sucking child can play with the serpent in safety.’ The brethren took the serpents carefully on sticks and carried them across the creek. I exhorted the brethren not to kill a serpent, bird, or an animal of any kind during our journey unless it became necessary in order to preserve ourselves from hunger.” (History of the Church, 2:71–72.)

The scriptures also give us instructions about the treatment of farm-type animals.  That this should be done with kindness is made clear under the Law of Moses where the Lord taught the people to be kind to the ox by not muzzling it as it was eating corn. (Deut. 25:4) They were not to cause undue strain on the animals by yoking them unequally. (Deut. 22:10) They were even counseled to help animals of their enemies (Exodus 23:4-5).  Also you might recall that we are commanded that animals also should be allowed to rest on the Sabbath. (Exodus 20:10)

We are shown, once again, God’s reverence for animals through two of the Savior’s names: Lamb of God and Good Shepherd.

It’s not necessary to have a pet if one doesn’t enjoy the company of animals, but God has made it clear that animals of all kinds should be treated with kindness and respect.

 Gramps

What is the Mormon Church’ stance on the Mark of Cain?

What is the Mormon Church’ stance on the Mark of Cain?

Question

Gramps,

I’ve been told several times that the dark skinned people are descendants of Adam’s son, Cain.  Thus the ‘Mark of Cain’.  Moreover, in the Book of Mormon, the Lamanites who repented of their sins, their skins became lighter.   What is the church’s position on this? Given the societal’s view on race.  Thank you.

Steve

 

Answer

Steve,

The Church has no position on such theories. In previous generations, many Church members and even leaders believed the idea you bring up. Today the Church has made it clear that such ideas are not part of revealed LDS doctrine. The nature of the Biblical “mark of Cain” has not been revealed to the Church, nor the exact nature or meaning of how the righteous Lamanites’ “skin became white” as mentioned in 3 Nephi 2. Such knowledge is probably unimportant to our current needs.

For further clarification, you might wish to read the essay on “Race and the Priesthood” that the Church recently published on its web site:

Race and the Priesthood

 

Gramps

Is the “Spirit of prophecy” and the “Gift of prophecy” the same thing?

Is the “Spirit of prophecy” and the “Gift of prophecy” the same thing?

Question

Gramps,

We know the “spirit of prophecy” is the testimony of Jesus.  Is the “gift of prophesy” the same thing as the spirit of prophecy, or is there a difference?

Amy

 

Answer

Amy,

The spirit of prophecy and the gift of prophecy are synonymous in the gospel of Jesus Christ.  The spirit of prophecy is a gift from God given through personal revelation; otherwise known as the spirit (gift) of revelation. In light of this, we can interchange spirit and gift, because prophecy is a gift from God.

The scripture provided, Revelation 19:10,

“and of they brethren that have the testimony of Jesus: worship God: for the testimony is the spirit of prophecy.”

A testimony is received through spirit of revelation.  Revelation that Jesus is the Christ, in and of itself, if also a prophecy.  When we bear witness of Jesus Christ and His second coming, we are prophesying of an event to come. We know that revelation is received to the heart and mind of the receiver from the Holy Ghost — the Spirit of God.

In our Doctrine and Covenants, section 46, we are informed every person is given a gift from God: “For all have not every gift unto them; for there are many gifts, and to every man is given a gift by the Spirit of God.”  We read later in this section (vs. 22), “And to others it is given to prophesy ” (the spirit of prophecy).

The spirit of prophecy is a spiritual gift which can be interchanged in our language and writing: the spirit of prophecy or the gift of prophecy. This also can be said for the spirit of revelation or the gift of revelation.

However, if we desire to be pedantic, one might say the “gift of prophecy” is solely an individual who has received the ability to prophesy (as a gift of the spirit) in contrast to another who has been given a different gift (let’s say healing).

 

Gramps

Should the talents we have be freewill offerings to build up the Kingdom?

Should the talents we have be freewill offerings to build up the Kingdom?

Question

Dear Gramps,

Many of the hymns we have in the LDS hymnal have copyright restrictions, which prevent us from fully utilizing the material as we would sometimes like to.  My question for you is this: Shouldn’t the use of our talents for the building up of the Lord’s kingdom be freewill offerings and sacrifices, with no expectation of financial reward in this life?  If something is created with the expectation of financial reward, then isn’t it really tainted in some way?

Robert

 

Answer

Hello Robert,

I would hope that most people would be willing to consecrate their goods of any kind to the work of the Lord.  Someday, as Church members, we will be expected to live this law more stringently.  But until that happens, it strikes me that it would be a little unfair to require artists and poets to turn their workproduct over to the Church without compensation without similarly mandating that plumbers, automobile manufacturers, carpenters, attorneys, secretaries, architects, bookbinders, and people in every other line of work must also ply their respective trades for free anytime someone can argue that “the building up of the kingdom” requires it.

It’s also worth remembering that there are legitimate reasons besides money, for obtaining a copyright.  Copyright can prevent others from illegitimately claiming a work as their own, from profiting from that work themselves, or from reproducing the work in such a manner as to embarrass the work’s author or undermine the actual goal of the work.  For example, while the Book of Mormon was at the printer’s shop in Palmyra, New York, a hostile newspaper editor was able to obtain portions of the manuscript and began printing them, together with commentary ridiculing the passages, before the actual book was available, so that readers could give it a balanced consideration.  The editor was stopped, because Joseph Smith invoked his copyrights under American law.

As a side note, it’s also important to point out that many of the composers and lyricists of the hymns that we enjoy aren’t or weren’t members of the church.

Gramps

Can you help me with the 13th Article of Faith?

Can you help me with the 13th Article of Faith?

Question

Gramps,

I have two questions about the 13th article of faith. First, where in the scriptures do we find “the admonition of Paul”? Second, where it says “We believe all things, we hope all things,” What are these “things?”  There are “things” I don’t believe or hope for. Are the “things” meant to mean eternal truths, the scriptures, the gospel or something else?

Janet  

 

Answer

Dear Janet,

It appears that Joseph Smith drew on Philippians 4:8 in drafting the thirteenth Article of Faith. It reads:


“Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.”


I am inclined to agree with you that the idea of “believ[ing]”, “hop[ing]”, and “endur[ing]” all things does not mean we should be gullible; rather, it is that we should accept and endure true teachings while discerning between that which is of God and that which is not. It may be noteworthy to point out that in 2 Timothy 4:3, Paul warns Timothy about those who “will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears”.

There is a good article that came out in the Church News in 1992. You can read it here.

 

Gramps

Saved by grace? Then why do we need the Book of Mormon?

Saved by grace? Then why do we need the Book of Mormon?

Question

Hello Gramps!

I need to know for my own sake after having conversations with my daughter’s father (my ex) that he is leaving the LDS church because he has a problem with 2 Nephi 25:23.  “For we labor diligently to write, to persuade our children, and also our brethren, to believe in Christ, and to be reconciled to God; for we know that it is by grace that we are saved after all we can do.” He argues that we are saved no matter what we have done in our lives as long as we have faith in Christ.  He says that the referenced scripture above does not say that. He says that LDS believes that we have to do “certain” things to be able to live with GOD and according to the New Testament this is not so. He mentions our former prophet Kimball and his teachings as well. Can you help me out here? Also, why would we need the Book of Mormon IF we live (to the best of our abilities) as Christ did and taught? Since we are saved by grace? I would be so very grateful since I worry about our daughter who is at a critical age. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Help 

 

Answer

Dear Parent,

Your daughter is of utmost importance in your request. Do not lose sight of that, and I will try to do the same in my response. How do you teach her faith? Especially when someone with an opposing opinion holds influence. The key here is that you are transmitting your own values to the next generation, not abstract principles or well-proved theory. Get comfortable with what you believe and it will be that much the simpler to explain it.

A question of faith

So take a moment to determine where you stand on faith. What does it mean to have faith in Christ? Can you have faith in other things (is there a secular application of faith)? Is faith different from belief, or a synonym? Is faith different from positive-thinking? Do I have faith in Christ? How do I know? Can others tell if I have faith in Christ? Does it matter if others can tell or not?

Similarly, take a moment to determine where you stand on works. What is a work? Is an ordinance work? What about prayer? Is obedience work? What if obedience is simply abstaining from evil (“thou shalt not”) – is that still a work? Why do I perform my works? Is there a relationship between my faith and my works? Is there a relationship between my works and my faith?

Take your time in answering these questions. You will probably come up with more as you ponder them. What will come out of this exercise is what you really believe. As I read over your concerns, I am hearing what your ex-husband thinks you believe. He doesn’t get to define that – you do. I’ll address a number of your concerns by sharing what I believe, but these are really just points for you to ponder in arriving at your own position.

Do we need additional scripture?

Let me first address the Book of Mormon concern. In the context of faith, why do we need additional scripture? Isn’t the New Testament enough if we actually lived its precepts? I don’t know if this question comes from your ex-husband or yourself, but it shows great confusion. How can you accept a no-works policy and still maintain that it’s sufficient to “live (to the best of our abilities) as Christ did and taught”? Following the example of another is a work! Following the teachings of another is also a work!

But this question shows further misunderstanding of faith. Paul teaches where faith and salvation come from: “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher? … So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:13-17). Asking why have additional scripture is like asking why do we need more preachers. Hearing God’s word builds faith unto salvation. The Book of Mormon, as God’s word, does just that.

In practice, I think what you will find is that someone who is trying to live a life patterned after Jesus and His teachings will embrace additional scripture, as it reveals more of the divine nature of our Lord. Nephi testified, “if ye shall believe in Christ ye will believe in these words, for they are the words of Christ;… and they teach all men that they should do good (2 Nephi 33:10). If your daughter asks why you need The Book of Mormon ask her what she gets out of it. Does it teach her of Christ? and add your own witness of what it means to you.

Are we engaging in the right discussion?

Oftentimes in our cross-faith discussions, we (as humans) paint the other side at extremes so we can more easily debunk a position. It is, after all, considerably easier to pound a strawman than a living, breathing opponent. Uncharitable Evangelicals have taken our principles of industry to show that we rely on ourselves for our salvation and not the Savior; in turn, uncharitable Latter-day Saints have taken their principles faith and grace to show that they feel salvation is a license for sin and debauchery. In truth, neither is an accurate representation of either religion. In the conversations I’ve had with others of different faiths, and in listening to the various sermons they give on the subject I feel confident in telling you that both camps employ a combination of grace and works in daily faith journeys. That’s not to say there aren’t differences in the two perspectives, but the disagreement is not in whether or not there’s a place for these gospel principles.

My own perspective on it is that if you are asking which is more important – grace or works – you are engaging in the wrong discussion. C.S. Lewis (in Mere Christianity) compares them to two blades of a pair of scissors. Which blade is more important? The question is nonsense of course. Any work without faith does little for the busybody. It may in time bring the laborer to faith (John 7:17), but if it fails to do so, it has no personal merit towards salvation. Conversely, if a believer professes faith but does not bother to follow it up with works, that faith is highly suspect (James 2:17-18). The verse you opened with is an excellent blend of the two, pointing out that there are works which we must do while acknowledging our dependence on Christ. If your daughter asks why it is not enough to simply have faith, you may want to take some time to understand better her beliefs about faith. Ask the questions I started with. I would be very surprised if an honest Christian does not acknowledge a place for works in following her Master. Be sure to share with her your experiences as well.

Share your testimony of faith

Now I return to the important thing here, which is your daughter. She will ask you questions that will be verbatim barbed inquiries you’ve heard from her father. Recognize that these are not the same questions, because they are asked by a different person. I was speaking with someone about the Church, and he said he wanted to make sure both sides were addressed in our conversation. So he pulled out some critical material he found and started asking me questions. At first, I responded as though I was talking to the author. It was the wrong way to address my friend, as it became apparent that although he was asking the questions, he did not understand why the question was a criticism. My responses were not answers for him and only served to confuse him. I changed my approach and asked him to paraphrase the questions for me, so I could understand better what he was asking and not what the author was accusing. I recommend a similar approach with your daughter. Answer her questions, not her father’s criticisms.

And by all means share your testimony with her! Not the testimony you wish you had, or that you think a good Latter-day Saint should have – yours! She is trying to understand her relationship with God and she is learning it from her mother and her father. She is trying to understand which of her parents, if any, really has faith in Christ. There’s a simple test for this. Take a look at the fruits. Is it a spirit-filled life or a carnal one? “The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, Meekness, temperance” (Galatian 5:22-23). She can judge her parents’ faith on whether the Spirit is changing them. Is there peace, love, and joy in your home? Are you more longsuffering, gentle, and good than you were before? Or conversely, are you becoming more carnal and faithless? “Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery ,fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, Idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, Envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: …they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God” (Galatians 5:19-21). It is not your place to be an accuser of her father (I think that would probably fall under “revellings”), but to work on your own faith such that she can see and desire the fruits you bear.

Gramps

What is meant by “our four minutes” spoken of in General Conference?

What is meant by “our four minutes” spoken of in General Conference?

Question

Gramps,

In General conference a speaker referred to “our 4 minutes”. Please explain what that means.

Carol

Answer

Carol,

The talk you are referring to was given by Bishop Gary E. Stevenson.  It’s entitled “Your Four Minutes.”

In his talk he brings up Noelle Pikus-Pace, a Mormon athlete who performed in the 2014 Olympics in the Skeleton event.  He mentions the years and years of training it takes for these athletes.  In Noelle’s case, those years of training is all determined by a series of four 60 second races as to whether she would win an Olympic medal or go home empty.

Bishop Stevenson said this regarding her run for an Olympic medal:

“It may seem unfair that Noelle’s entire Olympic dreams hinged on what she did during just four brief minutes. But she knew it, and that is why she prepared so diligently. She sensed the magnitude, the urgency of her four minutes, and what they would mean for the rest of her life.”

Bishop Stevenson likened Noelle’s four minutes to our own journey through life.  Our life here on earth is but a brief moment in time in the entire eternal perspective.  How we live our life here on earth will determine our eternity.  Eternal life and the Celestial Kingdom is our gold medal.  Everything we do in this life should be working and progressing towards winning that “gold medal.”

 Bishop Stevenson also had this to say:

“Now, consider how your pathway to eternal life is similar to these athletes’ “four-minute performance.” You are an eternal being. Before you were born, you existed as a spirit. In the presence of a loving Heavenly Father, you trained and prepared to come to earth for a brief moment and, well, perform. This life is your four minutes. While you are here, your actions will determine whether you win the prize of eternal life. The prophet Amulek described, “This life is the time … to prepare to meet God; yea, behold the day of this life is the day … to perform [your] labors.”

In a sense, your four minutes have already begun. The clock is ticking. The words of the Apostle Paul seem so fitting: to run the race, that you may obtain the prize.

 In the same way that certain steps are essential in the very brief performance of an Olympic athlete—jumps or maneuvers for ice skaters and snowboarders, negotiating the turns of a bobsled run, or carving through the gates of a downhill slalom course—so it is in our lives, where certain things are absolutely essential—checkpoints which move us through our spiritual performance on earth. These spiritual markers are the essential God-given ordinances of the gospel:baptism, receiving the gift of the Holy Ghost, priesthood ordinations, temple ordinances, and partaking of the sacrament each week.”

Bishop Stevenson is asking if we are seeing the urgency of our “four minutes” here on earth and how it relates to our eternity.

Each day we should stop and ask ourselves, “What are you doing with your four minutes?”

Gramps

How do I find a meetinghouse so I can return to activity?

How do I find a meetinghouse so I can return to activity?

Question

Gramps,

I used to be a Mormon when I was younger, but for personal reasons I left the church. Now I am a teenager and wondering how I can be a part of the church. However, no one in my family is LDS and I have moved so I would be going to a different church and I don’t know how to contact anyone to get in. If you could give me any advice that would be really helpful. Thank you for your time.

Sam

Answer

Sam,

It is always good to hear about people wishing to return.  It is really quite easy.  Most people who worry about being able to return, find that when they do, a lot of their worries and fears were groundless.

The Church makes it really easy to find the ward that covers your geographical area.  You simply go to LDS.org about midway down the page you will find a Quick Links Section.  One of those links is Meeting House Locator.  Click on it.  Enter your address or nearest cross streets into the search bar and let it search.

Here is a link to the meetinghouse locator.

It should return the physical address of the Church, the time of the meetings and the name and phone number of the bishop.  At that point you have all the information you need to return.  I am a fan of just showing up and attending the meetings, but if you like, you could also try calling the bishop and introducing yourself and asking any questions you might have.

The biggest thing about returning is to simply to get in the door and take part.  Everything else will follow from that.

Gramps

Page 1 of 1212345...10...Last »
Copyright © 2015 Ask Gramps - Q and A about Mormon Doctrine. All Rights Reserved.
This website is not owned by or affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon or LDS Church). The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. The views expressed by individual users are the responsibility of those users and do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. For the official Church websites, please visit LDS.org or Mormon.org.

Pin It on Pinterest