Why does the LDS Church ask for 10% tithe considering what is written in the Book of Mormon?

Why does the LDS Church ask for 10% tithe considering what is written in the Book of Mormon?

Question

 

Hey Gramps!

Could you explain why the LDS Church asks for 10% of members income considering what is written in the Book of Mormon chapter 8:32-33.

 32 Yea, it shall come in a day when there shall be churches built up that shall say: Come unto me, and for your money you shall be forgiven of your sins.

 33 O ye wicked and perverse and stiffnecked people, why have ye built up churches unto yourselves to get gain? Why have ye transfigured the holy word of God, that ye might bring damnation upon your souls? Behold, look ye unto the revelations of God; for behold, the time cometh at that day when all these things must be fulfilled.

I’m confused.  Many thanks.

Shell

Answer

 

Dear Shell,

The scriptural importance and benefits of a person’s paying tithes and offerings, are well-established (see. e.g, Malachi 3; Luke 21:1-4; D&C 64:23; D&C 85:3).  That, in this dispensation, it is the Church’s prerogative to receive and administer those tithes, seems equally clear (see D&C 119; D&C 120; D&C 97).

Mormon 8:32-33 does not strike me as being directly applicable to the LDS Church (or any church, for that matter), unless one can first establish at least one of the following:

1.  That the church purports to offer forgiveness of sins in exchange for nothing more or less than monetary payment;

2.  That the church has been built up for the specific purpose of getting gain; or

3.  That the church has “transfigured the holy word of God”.

I do not believe that any of those three conditions applies to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

 

Gramps

 

 

 

Can someone engaged in a liquor selling business pay tithes?

Can someone engaged in a liquor selling business pay tithes?

Question

 

Gramps,

Can somebody engaged in an liquor selling business paid tithes. Doesn’t that offend God considering that the nature of the business is against the word of wisdom?

Wilfredo

 

Answer

 

Wilfredo,

There is a scripture where the Lord commands us to deal with the beam in our own eye before we worry about the mote in someone else’s eye.  Before you worry about whether somebody is offending God in some manner, you should be asking, am I offending God?  Like the apostles, when the Lord tells them that one would betray Him, we need to be asking “Is it I?”

One of the ways to truly offend God is to not seek after Him, not to seek his counsel and wisdom in our choices and actions.  One of the bigger choices in our lives is what we do to support ourselves and our loved ones.  When it comes to finding a job there are lots of factors that are highly individualized, and we should absolutely be on our knees in prayer as we consider what kind of employment to take.  If we are asking the Lord for His help and if we then take the answers He gives and apply them, then we will not offend God.  However if we ignore Him and do not follow, then we do very much offend God, and we need to repent.

Very few of us manage (even with the Lord’s help) to get what we would think is the ‘perfect’ job.  This life is about being challenged and learning and growing. The employment we take can be a big part of this.  We should expect from time to time that our job will pose challenges for us.  The Lord is very interested in how we grow from dealing with those challenges, so He will not take them away from us.

Paying tithing on our increase is also what God has commanded us to do.  That in and of itself can not offend God.

 

Gramps

 

 

 

Should we pay tithing on Social Security?

Should we pay tithing on Social Security?

Question

Gramps,

My wife and I recently retired.  We have begun receiving Social Security and Medicare.  What do you advise regarding tithing?

Jack

 

Answer

Jack,

Tithing is an important commandment for several reasons. The obedience of the commandment helps build an appreciation for sacrifice. The money is used to provide needed support for the Church such as maintaining the meetinghouses, temples, and publications that are used during the Sabbath. I could continue, however I feel you are quite well versed in the principle already.

The scriptures tell us this in Doctrine and Covenants 119:4

 And after that, those who have thus been tithed shall pay one-tenth of all their interest annually; and this shall be a standing law unto them forever, for my holy priesthood, saith the Lord.

So the standard is one tenth of all our interest annually. Simple enough so far. However the actual definition of that has some room for interpretation. For instance the most common question is “Does that mean our gross income, or is it after taxes?” In my thinking, and according to nearly every bishop I’ve discussed this with, the actual answer is left up to us. We actually do not answer to the bishop for our tithes, but to the Lord. We give an accounting to the bishop as to whether or not we feel we are full tithe payers. As such, if we feel we are honestly paying a full tithe, then we may answer ‘yes’ with a clean conscience.

As for your question regarding payment of tithes during retirement years, I feel that the same conditions apply. Suppose you paid tithes on your gross income all your life. You could, possibly, consider your retirement benefits to have already been tithed, and thus not pay further tithing on them. This is the rational approach that I can put together. However I think it misses the spirit of the commandment as it was intended. Let me approach this from a different angle.

Let’s briefly discuss the Word of Wisdom. Clearly, all the ways it can be obeyed and disobeyed are not given within the scriptures themselves. Instead it was given as ‘a principle with a promise’. To my ears, the Word of Wisdom, and by connection, the Law of Tithing, were given to us in the spirit of educating us in the ways of God. In other words, the obedience to the principle was, and is, intended to open our eyes and broaden our minds to what takes place as obedience becomes habit, and as habit becomes lifestyle. While both laws are clear in their immediate intent, the long-term purpose can sometimes elude us. For the Word of Wisdom, the long-term purpose is to look to our health and maintain our bodies as best we can in this life. At first we are told to do this out of common sense; not many people want to be deliberately sick all the time. However the long-term impact comes around due to the respect we are paying to the Savior Jesus Christ by taking care of the bodies He suffered and died for so we could regain them in the eternities.

Thus, tithing in the here and now is obedience to help support the Church in its ecclesiastical efforts, from which we benefit directly as members. The long-term message is to gain an understanding that whatever we give to the Lord, whether out of mere obedience, or out of loving and willing sacrifice, we do so trusting that he will make a better use of those funds than we would. We do so trusting that sacrificing whatever is asked will bring upon us blessings from heaven too numerous to count. We then gain the understanding of how temporary and small the greatest and most wondrous things the world can offer truly are. They are insignificant compared to the promises, blessings, and glory awaiting those who are obedient to the will of the Lord.

Ultimately, whether you tithe your retirement benefits or not, again, that is a matter between you and the Lord. Making it a matter of prayer will always lead you true to His path. May God be with you always.

 

Gramps

Can I give directly to the poor and call that tithing?

Can I give directly to the poor and call that tithing?

Question

Gramps,

 I have asked many questions of you. Some you answered, some not. This very important question affects a lot of people.  I try so hard to follow D&C 119 and Section 83.  A lot anonymously (not bragging). But my inspiration leads me to think the Church could help us prepare. The leaders, out of necessity, are becoming administers to business. I consider meeting my obligation to Sec.119 by directly (anonymously)  paying tithes to our very old, special needs people

 I pay full Tithe to Church. It spends millions on  property, buildings, businesses, investments. (some of bad repute). Church says prepare economic crisis. Church could use millions on farms, ground, store houses stuffed with needful stuff. In my area good members are poor. I pay more anonymously.  I  feel I need to pay more directly to the poor and not the church. Will God recognize this as my Tithe? God will know. Church will not know, is that important?

Jon

 

Answer

Jon,

I think you’re skipping verse 1 in section 119.

“Verily, thus saith the Lord, I require all their surplus property to be put into the hands of the bishop of my church in Zion,”

It is a mistaken approach to personally interpret scripture in opposition to the teachings of those anointed to lead God’s Church in these latter-days. The proper way to pay tithing has been clearly established. Paying it in some other way and then calling it tithing is inappropriate and will not count as tithing. Yes, credit given where credit due, if we help the poor it is good. It is, in fact commanded of us that we do so if able. But this is a separate command from tithing. Tithing is to be paid to the bishop – 10% of our increase. That is the law.

Concerning the leaders becoming administrators to business, I have to ask in response, what’s the problem with that? Certainly you must understand that as the Church has grown into the size it is, that the administrative side of it would also have need to grow as well.

That being said, I reject the implication that business is all, or even primarily, the concern of our leaders. A simple look at President Monson’s travel schedule over the past years indicates a very different story. Most of his time is spent in temple dedications, missionary visits, and conferences of various sorts. This would be true for any of the general leaders. They are engaged in the Lord’s work. The fact that a portion of that work is to manage the temporal affairs of the Church does not take away from anything.

And I ask you as well, who are we to determine how the Lord will spend His funds? Are we called to make that determination? Do we have the authority or spiritual link to claim superior knowledge and understanding concerning the Lord’s will as to His kingdom on the earth.

There has been a fair amount of controversy, for example, in the recent past over the downtown Salt Lake shopping mall. Many accusations have sprung up around the web against the Church and the use of its funds. But I have to wonder, why is consideration never given to the idea that it was the Lord’s will. Somehow many of us seem to think we know better than the prophet, better than the apostles. Somehow we think ourselves more enlightened, more holy, and more in tune with God’s true will.

But we are not. Let’s show a bit of faith here that God is leading His Church. Let’s trust and sustain those He has chosen to do so, in both their efforts on the spiritual front and the temporal front of God’s kingdom.

President Gordon B. Hinkley addressed the church’s involvement in commercial business in October of 1985

.

“Why is the Church in commercial business of any kind?

Essentially, the business assets which the Church has today are an outgrowth of enterprises which were begun in the pioneer era of our history when we were isolated in the valleys of the mountains of western America. For instance, a newspaper was then needed to keep the people advised of what was going on at home and abroad. The result was the Deseret News,which has been published now for 135 years. In the 1920s, government officials encouraged newspapers to set up radio stations. That was in the infancy of the broadcasting industry. One such radio station was established by the Deseret News here in Salt Lake City. From that has grown, by the natural process of development, holdings of a number of broadcasting properties.

As all of you will recognize, the ability and the facilities to communicate are among our great and constant needs. The ownership of these properties, both newspaper and broadcasting facilities, while they are operated as commercial entities, both directly and indirectly helps us in our responsibility to communicate our message and our point of view.

The Church was a pioneer in the sugar beet industry to help our farmers who needed a cash crop. One of our present properties is an outgrowth of that.

A beautiful hotel was constructed adjacent to Temple Square seventy-five years ago to provide a comfortable hostelry for visitors to this city.

Merchandising interests are an outgrowth of the cooperative movement which existed among our people in pioneer times. The Church has maintained certain real estate holdings, particularly those contiguous to Temple Square, to help preserve the beauty and the integrity of the core of the city. All of these commercial properties are tax-paying entities.

I repeat, the combined income from all of these business interests is relatively small and would not keep the work going for longer than a very brief period.

I should like to add, parenthetically for your information, that the living allowances given the General Authorities, which are very modest in comparison with executive compensation in industry and the professions, come from this business income and not from the tithing of the people.”

Gordon B. Hinkley also addressed the church’s downtown Salt Lake efforts in 1999:

“We have a real estate arm designed primarily to ensure the viability and the attractiveness of properties surrounding Temple Square. The core of many cities has deteriorated terribly. This cannot be said of Salt Lake City, although you may disagree as you try to get to the Tabernacle these days. We have tried to see that this part of the community is kept attractive and viable. With the beautiful grounds of Temple Square and the adjoining block to the east, we maintain gardens the equal of any in the world. This area will become even more attractive when the facility now being constructed on Main Street is completed and the large Conference Center to the north is finished.

Are these businesses operated for profit? Of course they are. They operate in a competitive world. They pay taxes. They are important citizens of this community. And they produce a profit, and from that profit comes the money which is used by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Foundation to help with charitable and worthwhile causes in this community and abroad and, more particularly, to assist in the great humanitarian efforts of the Church.

These businesses contribute one-tenth of their profit to the Foundation. The Foundation cannot give to itself or to other Church entities, but it can use its resources to assist other causes, which it does so generously. Millions of dollars have been so distributed. Thousands upon thousands have been fed. They have been supplied with medicine. They have been supplied with clothing and shelter in times of great emergency and terrible distress. How grateful I feel for the beneficence of this great Foundation which derives its resources from the business interests of the Church.”

We also know that Joseph Smith in his role as leader of the Church planned cities and business, so it cannot be rightly viewed that the Church has corrupted some idealistic utopia that Joseph originally envisioned.

In fact the Lord addressed the Church’s need to deal with things “in the earth, and under the earth” in D&C 88:78-80

“Teach ye diligently and my grace shall attend you, that you may be instructed more perfectly in theory, in principle, in doctrine, in the law of the gospel, in all things that pertain unto the kingdom of God, that are expedient for you to understand;

“Of things both in heaven and in the earth, and under the earth; things which have been, things which are, things which must shortly come to pass; things which are at home, things which are abroad; the wars and the perplexities of the nations, and the judgments which are on the land; and a knowledge also of countries and of kingdoms—

“That ye may be prepared in all things when I shall send you again to magnify the calling whereunto I have called you, and the mission with which I have commissioned you.”

Your efforts to support the poor are commendable. But do not use one commandment to justify disobedience to another.

Gramps

Will not paying tithing bar us from obtaining exaltation?

Will not paying tithing bar us from obtaining exaltation?

Question

Gramps,

 I have been a member for years, in that time I haven’t gone a month without hearing a talk on tithing. The scripture from Malachi is always used. I’ve read all of he questions and answers on the site in regarding tithing. I get the impression paying tithing is the single most important earthly duty we have, even to the financial ruin of our families. What I haven’t seen is whether or not tithing will bar you from exaltation if all other ordinances are met. Can someone who struggles with tithing be exalted?

Interested

 

Answer

Interested,

I’m going to make a correction, and I hope you’ll bear with me as I am thinking this out.

A “single earthly duty”… doesn’t exist. We all have multiple priorities and different things to accomplish at different points in our lives. When we are young, being raised by our parents, our duty is to listen and honor our parents. It is to learn the gospel, magnify our priesthood, and prepare for missionary service.

When we are a young man, we are to serve an honorable mission, receive the education we need to support ourselves and a family, get married in the temple, and start that family. As we grow, and our family grows, we are to teach, by word and deed, what it means to be a follower of Christ. We may begin doing our own family history work. I understand now that the youth are encouraged to do family history work because of their familiarity with the technology.

If there is a “single earthly duty”, it is to live our lives in such a way that we can always be a worthy temple recommend holder who attends the House of the Lord as frequently as possible. We teach our children that temple worship and work is a priority, that the sealing of families throughout eternity is a priority.

While your question was centered more about tithing and if paying it affects our exaltation… I don’t know. What I do know, is that the payment of tithes is an outward showing of our faith in the Lord and the desire to support His work here on earth. It is through tithing funds that temples are built and maintained for our use, so we may be sealed to our ancestors.

Let us look at the OTHER scripture in Malachi 4:5-6.


5 Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord:

6 And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.


I’ve heard it said once that if we don’t have the Spirit of Elijah in our own hearts, we have an individual curse upon ourselves until we do. Remember that a curse is a separation from God because of sin. An improper attitude could be a sin, unless we humble ourselves to seek the Lord’s view, accept it, and sustain it. We can help sustain the Spirit of Elijah by paying our tithes, doing our temple work, attending the temple, and praising the Lord for the blessings that follow.

In this perspective, yes, the lack of the payment of tithes will hinder our exaltation, as well as the exaltation of those whose temple work we need to be doing.

 

Gramps

Does paying tithing have to come from pure intent for it to work?

Does paying tithing have to come from pure intent for it to work?

Question

Gramps.

Are you saying that even if you hate paying tithing and resent it, pay it any way and you will be blessed? I was under the impression that tithing like repentance has to come from pure intent or it does not work. Can you clarify?  We have been taught to pay tithing even if it leads to bankruptcy and homelessness.  That if we have faith nothing bad will happen to us financially.  I know of families who were living on a budget and and within their means but had their pay decreased by 50% and their tithing ruined.

Vandydad

 

 

Answer

Vandydad,

In our Doctrine and Covenants the Lord clarified the relationship between obedience and blessings when he stated, “There is a law, irrevocably decreed in heaven before the foundations of this world, upon which all blessings are predicated. And when we obtain any blessing from God, it is by obedience to that law upon which it is predicated.”  In relation to this verse, Yes, we are blessed for paying tithing even if we resent it, because we have obeyed a law irrevocably decreed in heaven.  A blessing predicated would be our ability to enter the House of the Lord and receive the ordinances therein for ourselves and to perform these ordinances for others.  Whether or not a person resents paying tithing or a person loves paying tithing, if both are full tithe payers they may enjoy the blessings our temples bestow.

Repentance on the other hand requires a humble heart to confess and forsake sin.  If we resent repentance there is no reason to change, so our efforts will produce no fruit.  There will be no change of mind or heart.  One might call this irony, an individual who resents the idea of repentance, which means a person is resenting change, yet this individual is praying to change.

In relation to your question about members paying tithing when they are financially strapped, we honestly have no financial promise that only good experiences will result if we pay our tithing.  If such a promise existed, then we wouldn’t see members of the Church without employment, but we do.  We wouldn’t see members of the Church who are unable to pay rent, utilities, groceries, et cetera, but we still do.  The Lord recognizes hard times may come upon his children, both the good and evil, as the Lord declared, “That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust” (Matthew 5: 45).

The question we must ask ourselves, “How much do we personally love the Lord and his commandments?”  Did not the Lord say, “If ye love me, keep my commandments”?  Thus, life’s circumstances may present us difficult, trying, choices in life.  Take the young father of four children who loses his job and then is employed by another company which pays 50% less than what he was currently earning.  They receive their pay check, they look over their bills, and recognize if they pay tithing they won’t be able to pay their car loan.  What do they do?  They have a choice, either to keep the commandment of God (trust), or to disobey the commandment (weakness) and receive no blessing.

In light of this example regarding a young father, I know, the words of Moroni enter into my mind and heart, “for ye receive no witness until after the trial of your faith” (Ether 12: 6).  The words of Abraham also enter into my mind and heart, “And we will prove them herewith, to see if they will do all things whatsoever the Lord their God shall command them;” (Abraham 3: 25)

When we experience personal or family trials it is important that we remember this scripture, “Look unto me in every thought, doubt not, fear not.  Behold the wounds which pierced my side, and also the prints of the nails in my hands and feet; be faithful, keep my commandments, and ye shall inherit the kingdom of heaven” (Doctrine and Covenants 6: 36-37).

May the Lord bless each of us to continue to be faithful as we show our love of God by keeping his commandments, even through difficult times, when we may resent the invitation/commandment to pay our tithing, which doesn’t help the ability to meet financial obligations when money is short. Yet, we still pay, because we love God and His righteousness.

Gramps

Did Jesus enforce tithing during his ministry?

Did Jesus enforce tithing during his ministry?

Question

Hi Gramps,

We recently had an investigator visitor in our Elders Quorum class. He was asking whether tithing was strictly enforced by Jesus during his ministry. He specifically asked us to quote from the New Testament. Can you help out? Regards.

Alex

 

Answer

Alex,

During his ministry Jesus told people to render unto “Cæsar the things which be Cæsar’s, and unto God the things which be God’s” (Luke 20:25). We also read of His response to the widow casting her mites into the treasury (Luke 21:2-4). The Lord clearly recognized the widow’s donation and sacrifice as a good thing. The widow’s donation was accepted by the Church as it existed at the time.

However we don’t really get to see any kinds of enforcement during Jesus’ mortal ministry. We do get to see it during the Apostle’s time. In Acts 5:1-11 we read the story of Ananias and Sapphira. They chose to withhold some of the money while lying about it. Because of their lies they were struck down.

Now for an investigator, none of these is Christ telling him directly that he personally should pay ten percent. For that the investigator needs to learn for himself that the Book of Mormon is true. Once he believes that, then he can find the Lord repeating and approving the words of Malachi in Third Nephi (3 Nephi 24). Malachi’s words were important enough that Christ Himself gave them to the Nephites, and that includes the instructions to pay tithes.

 

Gramps

 

Does my tithing really go to the Lord’s use?

Does my tithing really go to the Lord’s use?

Question

Gramps,

My church recently leader told me I had to pay my tithing to “him.” He told me to put it in an envelope and mail it to his home. I don’t feel comfortable about this. I used to pay it directly to the church, but recently, I have also been wondering if what I sacrifice of my family’s financial resources really even goes to the Lord. It seems like a lot of tithing goes to pay salaries for those who work in the church office building and at the different BYUs. Many of these church employees get generous compensation and some of the best employer insurance out there on the market for their families, while my wife can’t even get coverage, because we are below the poverty line and fall through a crack in the Obamacare system. I contacted both the federal and state government about the issue and they said nothing can be done unless she gets pregnant and has another baby, but even then the insurance will only last until she has a baby. I know the church won’t help my wife get coverage that’s fair and affordable either, yet they use our “widow’s mite” for their own employees. Can I go dig a hole and bury my tithing up to the Lord like Moroni did the golden plates, so I, at least, have some peace of mind who it’s going to?

Anonymous

 

Answer

Anonymous

If you mean your Bishop when you say ‘Church Leader’ then he’s actually correct. The Bishop is accountable for all tithes paid by members of his congregation. Mailing the tithing to the Bishop’s house is actually not uncommon at all in the church.

For the rest of your question, let me gently offer to you some of the items tithing funds are used for;

-Building and maintaining meetinghouses, stake centers, and temples as well as other Church facilities that are focused on the religious teachings and actions of the Church and its members.

-Printing lesson manuals used on Sunday, including the ‘Teachings of the Prophets’ series that has been ongoing for some years now. This also includes all the manuals for Gospel Doctrine, Gospel Principles, the Primary and Youth programs, etc. The reason all of these are provided to the members at no cost is because the money to print them came from tithing. In effect, we already paid for them.

Tithing funds are sacred funds, and not a penny of them is spent lining anyone’s pockets, let alone the Bishop. In fact, none of the leaders of the Church are paid until you get to the general level of authority such as a Seventy, Apostle or First Presidency. Even at that, their stipends are very modest, and are provided from other sources of income besides tithing.

What might interest you is that the Church owns a sizeable array of profitable businesses that have little if anything to do with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. These businesses must support themselves, pay for themselves, and pay their employees. An example would be KSL Radio in Salt Lake City.

Now, regarding the Church office building and those who work there, I can assure you that your tithing funds are not given to them, or used for any of their benefit packages. Once again, the Church owns other profitable businesses that they can morally and legally be used to pay for such expenses outside of tithing funds.

Look at your tithing slip and notice the different categories that people can select when filling it out. Any funds that are directed to specific areas must be used there and nowhere else. For instance, if I were to put, say, $120 in tithing, $40 in fast offering, and another $40 in the missionary fund, then that’s where the money must go. Nobody in the church has the authority to move the money from one category to another.

Every year, the Church conducts a very thorough financial audit on itself. The Church Auditing Department is an autonomous group of financial experts such as bankers and accountants. The only people they must answer to are the First Presidency. They have open access to all the financial records of the Church for the purpose of their audit. During General Conference, they present their report to the Church as a whole regarding the financial status of the Church.

Now, having said all that, let me tell you something in a different light.

When you pay your tithing, even if someone should misuse the money, or outright steal it, the blessings of paying your tithing in faith and obedience to the laws of God are still yours. You cannot be held accountable for what someone else may or may not do with your tithing money.

I’m not saying it never happens. We are, all of us, weak and mortal. Money can be a very tempting thing to steal in any situation. What I am saying is that you should not feel that you are in any danger should your tithing be stolen or misused.

I can assure you that if and when abuse of tithing funds is discovered, the problem is remedied quickly and completely. For instance, suppose a Bishop pockets tithing to help pay for his car. As soon as it is discovered, the Church would immediately remove him from the calling, suspend his membership and report the crime to legal authorities. Once the law has had its say, the Church will evaluate the outcome and determine if further actions are needed, up to and including excommunication.

Such an action on the part of a Bishop could be seen as fraud, theft, and maybe even other serious breaches of law.

While I said earlier that it certainly could happen, I feel impressed to tell you it is likely a very very rare thing to have happen. If you are still concerned, speaking with your Stake President might help. Certainly I advise you to pray about it. Heavenly Father will lead you to the answers and peace of mind you are seeking as soon as He sees that the time is right. I pray you will learn and grow even stronger in your faith in Christ as well.

May God be with you always.

 

Gramps

 

Is tithing really considered “fire insurance?”

Is tithing really considered “fire insurance?”

Question

Gramps,

My son, whom I love very much is not active in the church. He has a wife that is anti-Mormon, and they have 3 children. The oldest child just turned 13 years old. The lesson in Relief Society was about tithing. Not far into the lesson she asked the sisters if they believed that those that are LDS. will be destroyed by fire if they do not pay tithing. Many of the sisters replied yes to that question. I wasn’t one of them. I am a full tithe payer myself but my son’s wife would not be happy at all if my son started paying tithing. She is very difficult for my son to deal with and it would cause problems in their family if he should start paying tithing. I had to give the  closing prayer and that was very difficult for me to do. I really don’t believe God would or could do that to my son when he is such a good person. I really need your help in this matter. Right now I don’t much feel like ever going back to Relief Rociety.

Linda (more…)

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