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Question

 

Dear Gramps,

Is there a commandment in the church that says you can’t be re-baptized when recommitting yourself? I have a son who has been inactive, but is coming back. He just wants me to re-baptize him to show his recommitment to himself and God I guess. He has not been excommunicated, he does not want laying of hands for membership or Holy Ghost. He just wants me to do it. No recording of it, no witnesses. If there is a law against it where and why. Can you advise please?

Jon

 

Answer

 

Dear Jon,

Rebaptism to show recommitment to the gospel used to be common enough early in the Restoration, but I think it’s been about 150 years since we really practiced that. I don’t think there are any rules against it. It’s more that it isn’t done, because it isn’t necessary.  We have the privilege and opportunity to renew our baptismal covenants weekly when we partake of the Sacrament.

Because the Sacrament is something we can/should do weekly, there may be a tendency to take it for granted.  However there are blessings awaiting those who appreciate this sacred ordinance.  Elder Don R. Clarke gave a beautiful talk about these blessings (I recommend it), and in part he said:

“If we have spent time before sacrament meeting repenting of our sins, we can leave sacrament meeting feeling clean and pure. President Boyd K. Packer said: “The sacrament renews the process of forgiveness. Every Sunday when the sacrament is served, that is a ceremony to renew the process of forgiveness. … Every Sunday you cleanse yourself so that, in due time, when you die your spirit will be clean.” Partaking of the sacrament worthily can help us feel like the people of King Benjamin, who “were filled with joy, having received a remission of their sins, and having peace of conscience.

 

Gramps

 

 

 

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