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Dear Gramps,

I have a query from a friend who has recently lost her son, aged 33 from cancer. He was an active member of the Church but had not reached the stage of being ordained a High Priest. She would like to know, will he be made a High Priest in the Spirit World? It says in his patriarchal blessing that he would reside in the higher councils of the Church.

Lynne, from New Zealand

Dear Lynne,

A person who holds the office of Elder in the Melchizedek priesthood holds all of the priesthood. If you will listen to the wording used when ordaining someone to the priesthood you will find that if the candidate does not hold the Melchizedek priesthood, that priesthood is first conferred upon him, and then he is ordained to an office in that priesthood. If he is called from one office to another in that priesthood, the Melchizedek priesthood is not again conferred because he already has it, but he ordained to the other office, e.g. from Elder to High Priest.

The different offices in the Melchizedek priesthood pertain to different functions within that priesthood. The office of high priest is given to those who preside. For instance, persons that are Elders who called to serve in a bishopric, on a stake high council or in a stake presidency are first ordained high priests and then set apart to the office to which they are appointed.

I understand that there will be no ordinations in the post-mortal spirit world, while we are awaiting the resurrection; but after the resurrection, clothed with our eternal bodies, we will continue to progress and grow until we reach the maximum of our potential. The eternal kingdoms will undoubtedly be organized and operated under priesthood authority, and I would imagine that settings apart and ordinations would be a natural part of the administration of the government of God in the eternal worlds.

-Gramps

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