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Question

 

Gramps,

I just read your response to the mother about short skirts and modesty. Modesty is a matter of attitude. A girl can be dressed from neck to floor in a loose fitting gunny sack and still be immodest. The church is now airbrushing sleeves onto pictures of little girls in sleeveless dresses. Ridiculous! I realize an endowed member must wear sleeves, but a little girl? Or a teenager? What’s immodest about a bare shoulder, for heaven’s sake? Also, girls are told to be modest so they don’t turn the boys on. So why should girls be responsible for a boy’s behavior. Seems to me the boys should be taught to bridle those feelings.

Sharee

 

Answer

 

Sharee,

Thank you for taking the time to read my responses and to ask some additional questions while sharing your thoughts. I believe you mention a valid point, “Modesty is a matter of attitude.” Modesty, however also incorporates our manner of dress, speech, thoughts, and our personal conduct.

If we assume modest is solely a matter of attitude then I believe we are missing three other aspects of modesty: dress, speech, and our conduct. Let me explain, you mention a fully clothed woman in a gunny sack as still immodest, however, if a women or man has the correct attitude toward modesty but attends church fully nude — is s/he modest because they have the right attitude? You may say, “I didn’t say that,” and I would respond, “No, you didn’t,” however modesty solely presented as “an attitude” provides a segue way for other diluted interpretations of modesty.

Modesty begins while we are young and our age doesn’t define what is modest or immodest. Yes, young women, young girls, young men, young boys who are inappropriately dressed are still immodest. Truth doesn’t have any age limit. In fact, it is more important that as mothers and fathers that we teach this principle of modesty while our children are young.

I understand you may think the airbrushing attempts by the Church to be ridiculous; however, I, myself, would be more concerned with teaching my children and grandchildren what modesty is than being concerned with the Church’s airbrushing attempts. Why would the Church be airbrushing sleeves on pictures? I believe we find the answer and their willingness to follow through with their beliefs here, “Immodest clothing includes short shorts, tight pants, and other revealing attire. Young women should refrain from wearing off-the-shoulder, low-cut, or revealing clothes” (For the Strength of Youth: Dress and Appearance). Instead of governing what people wear when they take pictures they simply airbrush “modesty” into the pictures. I am truly unsure the problem here.

In our faith, both young men and young women are taught to bridle their passions, and they are taught virtue, chastity, and all that entails modesty; unfortunately, despite the Church’s and families best efforts some young men and young women do not heed the counsel. I, personally, am grateful for the efforts from our Church to teach modesty, and this is what I have taught my daughters and sons, and continue to teach grandsons and granddaughters. I want my daughters to know who that they are all children of our Father in heaven. Modesty entails our attitude and our manner of dress and conduct. When our dress, attitude, and conduct are not congruent then we are sending mixed messages. When my daughters’ dress and conduct are congruent then the correct message is being sent also. Modesty is also an outward expression of our love for God and our gratitude for the blessing of a body.

Our leaders have enlightened us with a principle of modesty, and allow us to govern ourselves. We, also believe, that the Lord has called these chosen servants to direct and guide us. These are the words they share from our loving Heavenly Father. I have come to knowledge myself that their words are correct, and modesty is more than our attitude alone.

 

 

Gramps

 

 

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